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world, four months after being shot by the taliban. she is pledging her life to helping others. the beautiful game looks ugly. nearly 700 football contest are investigated for match fixing. after five rendered years, richard iii is found buried in a car park. -- after 500 years. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also are around the globe. malala lost part of her skull when she was shot by the taliban, but she did not lose her passion for helping girls go to school. today she speaks on video for the first time since she was attacked four months ago, and promises to carry on working for others. she spoke shortly after having surgery to reconstruct her skull. >> her doctor says she has not shed a tear since she arrived. she has faced her ordeal with determination and calm. this is her, quietly on her way to surgery on saturday. 24 hours later, she was speaking. it is now clear that she has suffered no long-term brain injury or cognitive damage. >> they are like my mother and father. a mother and father are not with me, but i had wonderful doctors and nurse
continues to recover, today the taliban are the focus of talks in london between the leaders of pakistan and afghanistan. the goal is to create a more stable environment for when nato forces leave afghanistan in 2014. the mission is to get the taliban to negotiate peace, but what are the chances? >> 12 years into a war that has cost 440 british lives, the prime minister invited the leaders of both afghanistan and pakistan to talk about the threats facing them all. >> the united kingdom will continue to stand firmly behind both countries as they work together to bring peace and stability to the region. finally, the progress we have achieved today sends a very clear message to the taliban. now is the time for everyone to participate in a peaceful political process in afghanistan. >> as british troops prepared to withdraw from afghanistan and handoff to afghan forces, intense combat like this is rare now. the military believe they have done their job and that this insurgency, like all others, needs a political solution. >> the clock is ticking. we have until the end of 2014, maybe not as lo
palaces in northwest damascus has been hit by mortars. the pakistani school gold shot by that taliban for her campaign to get girls in education is making good progress with a recovery in the uk. many school children are defying the taliban every day by attending classes in areas where schools are being bombed. one of the worst affected regions. over 750 schools have been damaged their in recent years. >> we traveled into dangerous territory on the oscars of the city of peshawar. by day looks peaceful. by night, few dare to move apart from the taliban. and here is what they do. under cover of darkness. this girl's primary school was blown up last month. one of five schools bombed recently in the small community. the militants trying to teach lessons in fear. we found the people's nearby, crammed into a neighboring school. but carrying on with their lessons. the teacher says hanson, who came from the bombed schools? lots of little hands are raised. this is the front line in the taliban swore on education. the school is so crowded now, they are outside sitting in the mud. the older girl
-- today, your life is short but if you criticize the pashtuns, the taliban will come factory. i want asked abdul, the have protection if you say something that the taliban does not like? because we know karzai's brother was a big man in afghanistan and anytime someone criticized, that person never sees the day of life again. afghanis are good people, but the reality of freedom of press to me is like a joke. you cannot have freedom of press in afghanistan rid afghanistan is based on tripe. -- based on tribes. host: can you hang on the line while we get an answer and then come back to you? guest: i think what john is saying is really not the reality of afghanistan. i would put it this way. i don't know if he can get the kind of subscription we have in afghanistan. you can go to my facebook, twitter, and also to my blog and see what i am doing. how i as a reporter, in a normal citizen, a journalist, criticize the government, criticized karzai, criticized -- the way people are somehow creating the problems, it does not mean what they are pashtuns or -- anyone, criticizing just coming and killi
." the secret service is investigating. there is an update on malala the 15-year-old crusader thatan the taliban tried to murder. we've got an answer on what caused the lights to go out at the super bowl. and we'll take you to one of the world's great spectacles. meet 70 million pilgrims when the "cbs evening news" continues. suffer from is bigger than we think ... like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual behavior stop taking tamiflu and call your doctor immediately. children and adolescents in particular
.s.-led military coalition in afghanistan incorrectly reported a decline in taliban attacks last year, peter. >> right. jenna: firms said there was no actual change in the number of the attacks. meaning that it didn't get better there. >> right. jenna: the international attacks on our troops, attacks on international troops, pardon me, were the same in 2012 as 2007 ven. -- 2011. is that normal? do we revise that? what does that mean? >> it certainly the runs against the administration's narrative that things are getting better in afghanistan. i'm very concerned about this. was this a clerical error? things like this can happen. jenna: that is what they're saying. didn't add a number somewhere along the lines. they missed it. >> congress has to look at this. the get some answers. we're talking about drawing troops down there. we talked about terrorism and al qaeda. and we found out from that report we were just talking about a lot of these people trained overseas were trained in afghanistan. now we may have a security vacuum there. we need to reassess what we're doing in afghanistan based on
shot in the head four months ago by the taliban was discharged from a british hospital today. she underwent two surgeries over the weekend. she had skull reconstruction and received an implant to restore her hearing and will now continue her rehabilitation at her family's temporary home in england. the taliban shot her then because she was a critic to their on 6 of educating girls. >>> a new pole suggests hillary clinton is the most popular politician in the country today. the quinnipiac university poll found that. clinton everybody surpassed president obama and vice- president biden. she has denied planning a presidential run in 2016 but many political analysts say that may change. >>> power company officials say they now know what caused sunday's power outage at the super bowl. they say a device called a relay failed in the connection between the power line that comes from outside the new orleans superdome and the cable that carries power throughout the stadium. they say the relay had been installed as part of a 4 million dollar upgrade and is actually meant to prevent power ou
, for the first time since shot by the taliban for speaking out in favor of women's education we heard from the uncowed 15-year-old malala yousafzai. >> today, you can see i'm alive. i can see everyone. i can speak. and i'm getting better day by day. it's just because of the prayers of the people. because all the people, men and women, children, all of them have prayed for me. because of these prayers, because of these prayers, god -- god has given me this new life. this is a second life. this is a new life. and i want to serve. i want to serve the people. and i want every girl, every child to be educated. >> in cairo, wednesday, thousands of egyptian men and women took to the streets to protest rampant female harassers in the square. and it the result of rising assaults in tahir. in india, protests against sexual violence continues despite the government to enact new laws on rape and assault. on wednesday, an indian politician accused of raping a teenager in 1976, currently serving with the congress party. and it was documented in a disturbing report titled "breaking the silence". that cal
constant attack. but in october 2009, the taliban launched the most ferocious assault ever. and unleashed a deadly downpour of fire like shooting fish in a barrel. >> 360 degrees, we were taking, you know, rpgs, machine gunfire, mortar fire was coming in. i mean, it was accurate. it was, you know, on target. it was pinning positions down. >> reporter: the americans were vastly outnumbered, nearly 400 to 52. in the first hour, three u.s. soldiers were killed. others pinned down by gunfire. and with no regard for his own life, romesha led five others on a rescue mission. >> it was going to be a knife fight, getting to where we were going. >> reporter: romesha took out an enemy machine gun and then was blown off his feed by a rocket-propelled grenade. but many americans were still missing. romesha rallied a search party and plunged back into the fight. >> we had so many guys we hadn't heard from in forever. my biggest concern was they were going to take bodies away. we weren't going to let that happen. >> reporter: then the unthinkable. taliban fighters made it inside the wire and on to the
bob woodruff abc news new york. >> all the taliban did was create a hero. >> simply remarkable. >>> that's what's making news in america this morning. >> stay with us for "good >> live and in hd, this is "good morning washington," on your side. >> straight ahead, the baltimore ravens are in for another busy day. the city celebrating with a big parade. >> a little less than an inch. >> don't be surprised if you see more salt on the ground ben snow today -- than snow. many people wondering about that. i am scott thuman. >> i am cynne simpson. we will get to storm march coverage with jacqui jeras. where is the snow? >> it already moved through here. it went through hagerstown and martinsburg and they got a good testing. one or two inches in the panhandle of west virginia. the system fizzled around a d.c., so we came up with a lot of nothing. weak clippers sometimes fizzle as they move over the mountains. we do have another one waiting in the wings, so we expect another light snow showers or riflery's late tonight. most of that will stay to our north this time around. -- light sno
for the cleanup. the northeast digs out after a massive winter storm. and fighting back against the taliban and eshing t earning th medal of honor. the incredible story of clint romesha. you're crazy. honor. the incredible story of clint romesha. (mom) i raised my son to be careful... hi, sweetie. hi, mom. (mom) but just to be safe... i got a subaru. (announcer) love. it's what makes a subaru a subaru. [ male announcer ] how could switchgrass in argentina, change engineering in dubai, aluminum production in south africa, and the aerospace industry in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. try align. it's the number one ge recommended probiotic c" that helps maintain digestive balance. ♪ stay in the groove with align. ♪ need help keeping your digestive balance in sync? t
about that day the taliban overran his post. >> there was movement everywhere. muzzle flashes everywhere. you just couldn't pick them out fast enough. >> reporter: october 2009. up to 400 taliban fighters unleashed a torrent of withering fire on a remote u.s. outpost in eastern afghanistan. the attack, so fierce, in the end more than half of the 53 u.s. troops at the outpost were killed or wounded. but as buildings burned and the enemy ran freely through the outpost, soldiers became heroes. one in particular. >> i know that there's so many great soldiers out there, that would have stepped into my shoes and done the same thing. >> reporter: former staff sergeant clint romesha is a reluctant hero. that day he helped plan the recapture of the base and led troops in repelling the onslaught of taliban fighters. during a grueling day-long battle. romesha will receive the medal of honor, the highest award for combat bravery, becoming just the fourth living recipient among those serving in afghanistan and iraq. chris jones was a young private when the taliban struck. >> he is, in my opinion, the
with a member of the taliban. we have team coverage tonight. investigative reporter tony kovaleski has exclusive details about the suspect. we start with nbc bay area's arturo santiago with the details of this foiled plot. arturo? >> reporter: well, roj, the man was thought to be with the taliban, actually turned out to be an undercover fbi agent. he was so convinced he even developed a plan with the agent to train taliban fighters. but first, he wanted to blow up a bank. no one answered the door at the family home in san jose today, but neighbors say they heard about the man the fbi said was living here. >> it was shocking. >> to say the least. no, i don't have any information about those people. i've never met them before. i don't even know their names. >> reporter: in an affidavit, the fbi says during an undercover agent's initial meeting the suspect proposed car bombing the federal reserve bank in san francisco. they also say that the goal was to, quote, trigger a governme governmental crackdown which he suspected would trigger a right-wing counter response against the government followed by
. >> yeah, yeah. >> reporter: no access because the taliban who was in control for five years banned all religious music. >> if they knew you were listening to the music, they probably would kill you because they did not like music. >> reporter: today the taliban is out of power and 18-year-old yousufi is making up for lost time. he's joined afghanistan's first youth orchestra, which thanks to american funding is on tour in the u.s. >> afghan music is three plus four. >> reporter: we met as they practiced with the maryland youth orchestra. >> how is it to play with american students? >> it's wonderful really. i learn everything from everyone. >> reporter: the orchestra is the brainchild of ahmed sarmast. he fled afghanistan during taliban ruchlt he returned in 2008 with the mission of reviving the arts by opening a music school. it's impossible to have a cultural life when you do not have access to music. >> reporter: why is music so important? >> the power of music is so important for the healing of people. >> reporter: his students are ages 10 to 21. half
the inspiring, young girl targeted by the taliban, just because she wanted an education. >> abc's bob woodruff spoke to the girl's father about her surgeries and the challenges that lie ahead. >> reporter: malala's journey from this to this is nothing short of a miracle. and for the first time, people heard her voice. >> today, you can see that i'm alive. i can speak. i can see you. i can see everyone. and i'm getting better day by day. it's just because of the prayers of people. >> reporter: prayers and letters sent to this young girl who became a symbol of hope. she was just 12 when the taliban shut down her school. the public crusade began. >> i have the right of education. i have the right to play. i have the right to sing. i have the right to talk. i have the right to speak. >> reporter: her actions made her a target. last october, on her way home from school, she was brutally attacked. gunmen entered her van and shot her at point-blank range in the head. she was medevaced to england in critical condition. but she refused to die. the bullet glanced off her skull, traveled down her cheek a
that in total to our adversaries. in this case, it is the taliban. to get to your point about afghanistan being a base for al qaeda, it has been the goal of the administration to eliminate afghanistan as a base for al qaeda and similar elements. it remains to be seen if they can do that. a drawdown will make it more difficult for us to accomplish that in the long run. host: a couple comments on twitter, asking questions about positive accomplishments. guest: the surge was designed to replicate what happened in iraq. in iraq, you had a situation with the anbar awakening. you had the situation, being in, using local forces in order to gain the upper hand against the extremists, whether they were affiliated with al qaeda or were local sympathizers with saddam hussein. that basically worked from a military perspective. when you go to afghanistan, the time when general petraeus became the commander, the attempt was made to replicate what happened. the results were mixed. you had similar afghan units in several provinces that have been turned into a pretty decent area of success for our research effo
. >> megyn: thank you, sir. back in october of 2009 the taliban stormed a remote u.s. outpost in afghanistan, greatly outnumbering the 52 americans stationed there. staff sergeant clinton roamshea the man you see on screen right led the counterattack in the face of insurmountable odds and managing all of the, but eight men. and his amazing story as he receives the medal of honor. all right that's a fifth-floor problem... ok. not in my house! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! no no no! not today! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! jimmy how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? happier than dikembe mutumbo blocking a shot. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. try align. it's the number one ge recommended probiotic c" that helps maintain digestive balance. ♪ stay in the groove with align. ♪ need help keeping yo digestive balance in sync? try align. it's a probiotic that fortifies your digestive system with healthy bacteria 24/7. because your insides set the tone. stay in the groove with align. >> fox news alert live to the white house where we're
a symbol of freedom and taliban oppression. the amazing story of this pakistani girl who was shot in the head on her way to school by the taliban. she is doing much better and she has a lot to say. her message is a coming up. gregg: she's accused of murdering her boyfriend. now she has taken the witness stand and told the jury, yes, i did it. >> at the time i had plans to commit suicide. soy was extremely confident no jury would convict me because i didn't expect any of you to be here. i didn't expect to be here. ssor. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wouldn't need new shoes? and with all the points i've been earning, i was able to get us flight to our favorite climbing spot even on a holiday weekend. ♪ things are definitely looking up. [ male announcer ] with no blackout dates, you can use your citi thankyou points to travel whenever you want. visit citi.com/thankyoucards to apply. martha: fox news alert. an immigration hearing is getting underway any moment now in the house stkwrao judiciary. president obama is pushing for immigration reform as you well know. my two gues
news. >> the young pakistani girl, the taliban wanted dead has just taken a new step towards a full recovery. the latest on the teenager known by her first name around the world. and what doctors are doing to make her life a little bit more normal. and cats usually aren't too crazy about being in the water. so why is this guy swimming? [ coughs ] [ angry gibberish ] i took something for my sinus, but i still have this cough. [ male announcer ] a lot of sinus products don't treat cough. they don't? [ male announcer ] nope, but alka seltzer plus severe sinus does it treats your worst sinus symptoms, plus that annoying cough. [ breathes deeply ] ♪ oh, what a relief it is! [ angry gibberish ] [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know it, but your mouth is under attack. food particles infiltrate and bacteria proliferate. ♪ protect your mouth, with fixodent. the adhesive helps create a food seal defense for a clean mouth and kills bacteria for fresh breath. ♪ fixodent, and forget it. ♪ nfc, afc, offensive lineman, defensive tackles, quarterbacks and cornerbacks ar
on the investigation, just ahead. >>> also later, the pakistani teenager shot in the head by a taliban gunman. she's talking about her future. >>> the man charged with murdering a well known navy s.e.a.l. over the weekend is on suicide watch tonight, being held on a $3 million bond. texas authorities say he was tasers and restrained after he became aggressive with guards. one of the two men he's accused of gunning down is chris kyle. possibly the best u.s. military sniper ever. he served five combat tours in iraq. he had 160 confirmed kills. that's according to his best-selling book "american sniper." remarkably, he made one of those shots from 2,100 yards away, here's how he described the moment. maybe the way i jerked the trigger to the right adjusted for the wind. maybe gravity shifted and put that bullet right where it had to be. he was so feared by iraqi insurgents they put a bounty on his head. he survived the war, left the navy with a chestful of medals. back home in texas he was known for helping combat veterans struggling with ptsd. officials think that's what he was doing at that gun ran
and terrorism where boys and girls rarely get to play together, and music was banned under the taliban rule, but with help from the state department and the world bank and other supporters, these young afghan children are enjoying a rare moment of harmony here in the u.s. >> 13-year-old lala has been waiting two years for this moment. ♪ the chance to perform on the world stage while breaking snoer taliban tab your. girls and boys playing music together. >> which do you like better? the drums or the trumphet? which is more fun? >> the drum. >> the drums? >> she's one of 48 young musicians who attend the only music school in afghanistan where music was strictly banned under taliban rule. many in the group are orphaned by war. some even lived on the streets. today they are nearly 7,000 miles from home, bringing traditional sounds from their homeland. thn the tambore mixed with the western harmonies they are also learning. ♪ organizers hope the young musicians can learn about america and america can learn about afghanistan. music is making a comeback. >> should the future afghanistan show a
, the taliban wanted dead has just taken a new step towards a full recovery. the latest on the teenager known by her first name around the world. and what doctors are doing to make her life a little bit more normal. and cats usually aren't too crazy about being in the water. so why is this guy swimming? [ coughs ] [ angry gibberish ] i took something for my sinus, but i still have this cough. [ male announcer ] a lot of sinus products don't treat cough. they don't? [ male announcer ] nope, but alka seltzer plus severe sinus does it treats your worst sinus symptoms, plus that annoying cough. [ breathes deeply ] ♪ oh, what a relief it is! [ angry gibberish ] [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know it, but your mouth is under attack. food particles infiltrate and bacteria proliferate. ♪ protect your mouth, with fixodent. the adhesive helps create a food seal defense for a clean mouth and kills bacteria for fresh breath. ♪ fixodent, and forget it. ♪ nfc, afc, offensive lineman, defensive tackles, quarterbacks and cornerbacks are all living united. to ensure the academic
with someone he thought was a member of taliban was actually an fbi agent. prosecutors say he and the undercover agent built the supposed bomb. they say last night he drove an suv with the bomb inside to the bank and parked it. police said when he tried to set it off, that's when he was arrested at the live desk, keith russell, news 4. >>> this sunday is the super bowl for the recording industry. music's top acts will gather in los angeles for the 55th grammy awards. >> some notable names not among the nominees include justin bieber, nicki minaj and one direction. nbc's mark barger has a preview of those nominated for the big night. >> this is crazy ♪ >>> the song that was inescapable could prove irresistible at the grammys. >> if the song of the year goes to anyone other than carly rae jepson. >> the editorial director said in ed sheer ens. >> miguel's adorn. kelly clarkson's "stronger" and vaughn's we are young. call me maybe is still the clear-cut choice. this song was so good that everyone from sort of traveling baseball teams to muppets could sing it and it could sound
. that's why the taliban were not that hard to overthrow in 2001, because the people of afghanistan turned against this barbaric code that the taliban were trying to impose. and this is, you know, in iraq and afghanistan, hardly two of the most liberal, cosmo cosmopolitan countries in the world. today i suspect you're seeing much the same thing in northern mali. i suspect it's not proving very popular. however, the reason why these groups can have enduring appeal is because there's not a good alternative. and the problem that we faced, for example, in afghanistan is that brutal and unpopular as the taliban are, the government has often been worse because the government has not delivered any kind of justice. what the government delivers is a decision that goes to the highest bidder. so bad as the taliban may be, they're less corrupt, and you will get a more or less honest judgment out of them which will then be enforced with barbaric severity. that's not the ideal that people want, but it may be better than the alternative. i think the challenge that we face in countries such as mali
countries -- others injured. >> the team shot by taliban military is making a strong recovery and speaking out -- about the ideal. -- about the ordeal. she had reconstructive surgery in england this weekend and doctors say say she is making great progress. >> i am alive. i can see you. i could see everyone. today, i am getting better day by day. >> she used this ordeal to set up an education fund for young girls. doctors say she is expected to fully recover. she is wise beyond her years. >> absolutely. >> coming up at noon, it does not look like much now but this skull was one of the most powerful men in england. we will tell you who belongs to and a very odd place where it was found. >> in an effort to rebuild after hurricane sandy one key player is suggesting to people not to rebuild. why new york is looking to reclaim. >> death of an american woman traveling abroad in turkey. >> here is a live look outside where we are getting ready potential for more snow. jacqui jeras will tell >> you are watching abc 7 news at noon with scott thuman and cynne simpson. this is abc 7 news at noon. on y
of the pakistani schoolgirl shot by the taliban after two big operations. malala yousafzai was shot of by the taliban for saying girls should be allowed an education. surgeons in birmingham reconstructed her skull. >>> a recovery from super bowl fever. scientists say football fans who spent weeks of gearing up for big game may suffer from an imbalance of dopamine in the brain now that the season is over. some fans may need to watch reruns of the big game to ease themselves back into normal life. >> there's a syndrome for everything these days. wow, all right. >>> if you missed any of the action last night from the super bowl, we have all the highlights now from espn. >>> welcome to your "sportscenter" update, i'm jorge andres. the harbowl. super bowl xlvii. jim harbaugh and the 49ers taking on john harbaugh and the baltimore ravens. we pick it up in the second quarter. ravens up 14-3, joe flacco, looking to go deep. finds jacoby jones. he had one catch in the entire game. but guess what, a 56-yard touchdown. ravens up, 21-6 at the half. opening kickoff, the second half, san francisc
girl who survived being shot in the head by the taliban is speaking clearly and has now released her own video statement. the brave teenager's message to the world, a show of resilience for you this monday next. >>> also last night's battle between the ravens and 49ers set a new record for the longest super bowl ever, thanks in part to this, the blackout during the third quarter. we're going to take a look what may have caused the outage. is it beyonce's fault, jon? that is the big question. the halftime show, did it do it? jon: you know, at least people drank a lot of beer during that 34 minutes. jenna: it apparently helped the television ratings as welcoming across from the "new york times." very interesting. big story for us. we'll get to the bottom of this mystery, hopefully next. jon: new developments in the remarkable recovery of that pakistani teenager who defied the taliban. 15-year-old malala yousufzai was shot in the head last year after she spoke out for the rights of girls to get an education. now she is releasing a video statement speaking clearly about her recovery. jam
sense of passion and a sense of purpose. >> that's right, targeted by the taliban for wanting to go to school. abc's bob woodruff has the story. >> reporter: malala yousufzai's journey from this to this is nothing short of a miracle. and for the first time, you heard her voice. >> today you can see that i am alive. i can speak. i can see you. i can see everyone. and i am getting better day by day. it is just because of the prayers of people. >> reporter: prayers and letters sent to this young girl who became a symbol of hope. she was just 12 when the taliban shut down her school and the public crusade. >> i have the right to play, talk, speak. >> reporter: her actions made her a target. last october on the way home from school she was brutally attacked. gunmen entered her van and shot her at point-blank range in the head. she was medivacted to england in critical condition. she refused to die. the bullet glanced her skull, traveled down her cheek and into her shoulder. incredibly didn't enter her brain. as her story spread so did her following. i spoke with her father, a schoolteach
an undercover fbi agent kept close tabs on him as posing as a taliban operative. as part of his plan he first wanted to bomb the san francisco federal reserve. then he decided that was too secure so he chose the open bank of america site. according to the fbi, five gallon buckets like this one filled with chemicals would have been the basic pieces of the bomb. agents say he also purchased cell phones and other items to be used in a triggering device. the plan was to drive the bomb with its components packed aboard an s.u.v. and detonate it in a spot to bring down the entire bank of america building. it's a plot the customers were clearly shocked to here about. >> wow. seriously? >> the fbi said the man tried making contact with a taliban operative shortly after getting out of jail on an illegal firearms charge. he was arrested at his father's san jose home. that was in 2011. according to court documents he lived in an rv that he often parked on the front driveway. his father would not let him into the home alone in order to safeguard his younger children because of his son's history of drug u
by posing as a taliban operative. as part of his plan. f.b.i. says he first wanted to bomb the san francisco federal reserve. he decided that wasn't good enough and he chose the bank of america site. five gallons would have been the basic pieces. bomb. agents say he also purchased cellphones and other items to be used in on triggering device. the plan was to driver the bomb with the components packed aboard an suv and detonated in a spot to bring the entire bank of america building, a plot b of a casm customers were shocked to hear about. >> wow! >> he tried to make contact with taliban operative shortly after getting out of jail on an illegal firearms charge. he was arrested at his father's san jose home in 2011. according to court documents, he lived in an rv that he parked on the front drive wear. his father would not let him in alone because his son's history of mental health issues. he was arrested when police responded to a disturbance and police found he had an ak-47 and high capacity clip. neighbors are surprised by bizarre plot. >> anybody could live to someone so it happens, i gues
. the medal of honor, given to a staff sergeant who saved so many lives fighting the taliban. abc's chief white house correspondent jonathan karl was there. >> reporter: for clint romesha, a high honor and a heavy burden, for an american hero, leader of a band of heroes through one of the most intense battles of the entire war in afghanistan. >> clint, this is our nation's highest military decoration. it reflects the gratitude of our entire country. >> reporter: this video was shot by the taliban on the day that army staff sergeant romesha help rappel their attack. more than 300 enemy fighters against his unit of just 53 men, defending an outpost the president today called tactically indefensible. >> these men were outnumbered, outgunned and almost overrun. >> reporter: he's credited with retaking the outpost and helping save many of his brothers in arms. bull more than 20, including romesha, were injured and eight were killed. their families were here, and romesha spoke to us about them just before today's ceremony. there's no doubt your fallen comrades are going to be in that room with
to their school in kabul, where they have been trying to win back their freedom from the taliban and their music. now, they have come to america to perform. do you like america? >> yes. it's very beautiful. >> reporter: she plays the sitar, in a country where women almost never perform. eraj plays, too. for so long, there was no music. >> music was ban -- >> reporter: banned? >> banned. and they didn't want music. >> reporter: and the music wasn't the only thing stolen. do you have a mom and dad? [ speaking foreign language ] she tells us she's an orphan who lost bhoert mother and her father to the fighting with the taliban. do you remember your mom and dad? you do. ky i can see your smile. she wishes they could hear her music, just as we did. ♪ and right there waiting to perform for us, too, eraj. and just listen to what he said after hearing her. >> she's better than me. >> reporter: she's better than you? >> yeah. >> reporter: but he would play, too. ♪ he turned to her and said, she was playing better than him. >> that clearly shows the future of afghanistan. sometimes the girls can be mu
to trigger a civil war with help from the taliban. the plot hinged on the plan to blow up an oakland bank. what the suspect didn't know he was working with the feds the whole time. kpix reporter linda yee has the story the details. >> reporter: the target was this bank of america branch near the oakland airport. domestic terrorist suspect matthew llaneza who lives in san jose told the fbi he wanted to blow it up an act of violent jihad he hope would create a government crackdown leading to civil war. so met with a man he thought it was connected to the taliban and the mujahideen in afghanistan. it turned out he was an undercover fbi agent. the suspect brought the undercover agent here where they could do a little surveillance. the suspect pointed out some of the support beams where they could possibly park that car bomb and when it detonated, it would bring down this entire bank. and according to the criminal complaint, llaneza told the fbi agent he would dance with joy when the bomb exploded. bank customers today were shocked to hear about the plot.
strikes. the images that surfaced showing marines urinating on the corps of taliban fighters. the accidental burning of the koran that started a wave of violence that included the killing of u.s. troops. and the massacre of 16 civilians in a shooting rampage allegedly at the hands of an american soldier. >> we have a casualty. >> reporter: general allen fought back tears when he said more than 560 coalition forces were killed on his watch, the vast majority american. >> we acknowledge that there is a chair at a table at home, a chair that is empty and will always be. and we can never forget them. and they are in our prayers always. >> reporter: as general allen says his final good-byes here in afghanistan, what no one knows is whether general dunford will one day be holding his own handover ceremony or whether he will be the united states last commander in afghanistan. there's still plenty to do, before the end of 2014 general dunford will have to wind down america's longest war, bring home most of the remaining u.s. forces and staggering amount of equipment while handing the
.s. forces in eastern afghanistan under taliban attack, a wounded romesha ducked enemy fire to rescue other wounded soldiers and recover bodies of the fallen. david martin spoke to romesha about the battle. >> reporter: you have to see combat outpost keating to realize just how indefensible it was to an attack from taliban fighters. just 52 american soldiers were down there, plus staff sergeant cliff romesha. >> we were taking everything from, you know, very precise sniper fire, automatic weapons fire from machine gun positions. we were taking mortar and indirect fire, rpg fire. >> reporter: and where was it coming from? >> all 360 degrees around us. it was just from every high point. >> reporter: were you taking casualties? >> we had taken casualties from the first barrage of fire that came in and then continued to take them throughout the remainder of the firefight. >> reporter: a recreation of the battle shows romesha was everywhere that day running across open ground to reinforce one weak point after another. >> at one point, i witnessed three
the medal of honor to staff sergeant clinton romesha. in 2009 with forces under taliban attack, a wounded romesha ducked enemy fire to rescue other wounded soldiers and recover bodies. david martin spoke to romesha about the battle. >> reporter: you have to see come bout outpost keeping to realize how indefensible it was from an attack from these taliban fighters. just 52 american soldiers were down there, plus staff sergeant cliff romesha. >> we were taking everything from very precise sniper fire, automatic weapon fire marxshine gun positions. we were taking mortar and indirect fire, r.p.g. fire. >> reporter: where was it coming from? >> all 360 degrees around us. from every high point. >> reporter: were you taking casualties? >> we had taken casualties in the first barrage of fire that came in and then continued to take them throughout the remainder of the fire fight. >> reporter: a recreation of the battle shows romesha was everywhere that day-- running across open ground to reinforce one weak point after another. >> at one point i witnessed three enemy fighters just walk straight thr
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